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Decatur Medical Office
(404) 298-5557

Snellville Medical Office
(770) 736-7020

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About Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a condition in which the nerve fibers inside the eye are destroyed. There are several types of glaucoma, the most important types are primary open angle (POAG) and narrow angle glaucoma (NAG).

In POAG each eye has about 1 million nerve fibers. They come together in the back of the eye to make up the eye nerve. Glaucoma destroys nerve fibers. When many nerve fibers are lost the eye becomes blind.

There are no symptoms until very late in the disease. There is no pain. In late POAG side vision is lost. Central vision (used for reading and similar tasks) remains relatively good. The field of vision narrows. The patient feels as if he is looking through a long narrow tube. Just the central, straight ahead vision is clear. When driving across an intersection such a patient might be able to read the license plate of the care in front of him, but would not be able to see the car coming at him from the side.

In NAG, patients often have acute attack of eye pain due to sudden increases in eye pressure. Between attacks the eye pressure is normal.  These “attacks” happen when the “angle” between the cornea (the clear window of the eye) and the iris (the colored part of the eye). Some people are born with the narrow, slit-like draining angles. In such people, anything that further narrows the angle prevents adequate drainage and causes the pressure to build up.

To be sure you do not have glaucoma, have a complete, dilated eye exam. We routinely check the nerve, the eye pressure, and the draining area. If the eye exam is normal, and you do not have a family history of glaucoma, it is pretty safe to assume that you do not have glaucoma.

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About Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a condition in which the nerve fibers inside the eye are destroyed. There are several types of glaucoma, the most important types are primary open angle (POAG) and narrow angle glaucoma (NAG).

In POAG each eye has about 1 million nerve fibers. They come together in the back of the eye to make up the eye nerve. Glaucoma destroys nerve fibers. When many nerve fibers are lost the eye becomes blind.

There are no symptoms until very late in the disease. There is no pain. In late POAG side vision is lost. Central vision (used for reading and similar tasks) remains relatively good. The field of vision narrows. The patient feels as if he is looking through a long narrow tube. Just the central, straight ahead vision is clear. When driving across an intersection such a patient might be able to read the license plate of the care in front of him, but would not be able to see the car coming at him from the side.

In NAG, patients often have acute attack of eye pain due to sudden increases in eye pressure. Between attacks the eye pressure is normal.  These “attacks” happen when the “angle” between the cornea (the clear window of the eye) and the iris (the colored part of the eye). Some people are born with the narrow, slit-like draining angles. In such people, anything that further narrows the angle prevents adequate drainage and causes the pressure to build up.

To be sure you do not have glaucoma, have a complete, dilated eye exam. We routinely check the nerve, the eye pressure, and the draining area. If the eye exam is normal, and you do not have a family history of glaucoma, it is pretty safe to assume that you do not have glaucoma.

(404) 298-5557
465 Winn Way, #10 - Decatur, GA 30030

(770) 736-7020
1700 Tree Lane Road, #135 - Snellville, GA 30078